Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Tombstones & Cemeteries

My entry for Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Tombstones & Cemeteries.


Mr Kipps of Bodnat
Mr Kipps of Bodnat
Cat to the McClarens 1943 – 1950

Here Lyes Pugg Who died Feb 17 1702
Here Lyes Pugg
Who Dyed Feb 17 1702
Also Old Towzer
15 July 1754 Aged 14

Cees Fun Foto-Headstones 3

Cees Fun Foto-Headstones 4

There has been a place of worship on the site of St Bartholomew’s Church, Chipping sine the late 6th century. St Bartholomew is the patron saint of butchers and the current building was built circa 1506.

In the churchyard is a sundial inscribed with the initials of the church wardens (IH RP IB TK) and dated 1708.


Please feel free to comment, make suggestions and leave any questions you may have.


11 Comments

  1. The pets’ gravestones are particularly poignant to me … sort of in the same category as those of babies and people who died tragically young, even though the pet may have lived a long, healthy and happy life! I’m one of those people who like to wander round cemeteries. As is to be expected, they’re peaceful places and a fascinating source of history. Lovely to see these photographs, Alan.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Sorry Alan, I’ve just seen this. I’m obviously still not familiar with using WordPress as I thought all replies would show when I click the little bell thingy at the top of the page, but I was wrong!
        Having been brought up in Scotland (Glasgow), we often visited Edinburgh and, of course, Greyfriars Kirk where wee Bobby is buried with his master. You’re right, the cemetery is very striking and its history goes way beyond that of Bobby’s story. It’s a great place to visit and photograph. I love Edinburgh!

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    1. Don’t miss Tracy Emin’s £60,000 4 inch sparrow in the Oratory grounds !!!!!! By my reckoning Anthony Gormley’s “Another Place” with its 100 6 foot statues should have cost £108 million. But what do I know 😉

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      1. Just looked it up. I will reserve judgement until further contemplation, lol. Seems it’s caused quite a stir, having been stolen a couple of times. I looked up the Oratory and the website says it’s closed at the moment for conservation work – have you any idea when it’s due to open again, Alan? I was also disappointed not to get into the grounds of St. Luke’s church, as there was some work going on there too. Hopefully, the work will be finished soon.

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      2. The Oratory, even when not having renovations, tends to be shut more often than it’s open. I have never been able to establish any discernible pattern. It doesn’t seem follow that it’s open during school holidays or special events but I could be mistaken. Personally speaking, I visited it 3-4 years ago as it happened to be open whilst visiting the cathedral, it has some interesting pieces but not a lot to warrant repeat visits.
        Don’t know about St Luke’s. Will let you know if I hear anything about either reopening.
        Whilst your in that neck of the woods, take a walk along Upper Duke St, towards the centre to where it meets with Great George Street. There you will see the Chinese Arch.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. I only got the picture of Pugg and Towzer gravestones as I was leaving. I want to go back to see if there are any paintings of the dogs in the house (Dunham Massey, Cheshire,) so as to include them into this post.

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